stretch mark tattoo laying down

Image from Pinterest

Most people think of tattoos as a way of showing off parts of your body. But did you know they also work to cover up things you don’t want people to see?

It’s true: many people are tattooing over stretch marks and scar tissue with their dream designs. The final result allows them to look awesome while feeling more comfortable in their own skin.

Want to learn more about the process? Keep reading to discover everything about it!

Size Matters

pregnant tattoo

Image from Authority Tattoo

Is tattooing over stretch marks and scars possible? The short answer is “yes.” The longer answer is, “you may be getting a bigger tattoo than you imagined.”

Basically, the size of what you are covering up determines the size of the tattoo. Someone who has really long stretch marks, for instance, might end up with a really long horizontal tattoo.

Once you’ve decided you definitely want the tattoo, you have a few options available to you.

Different Options

self love stretch mark tattoo

Image from Love What Matters

An option that many people don’t consider is to have a tattoo artist use flesh-colored ink. In this way, the tattoo becomes a kind of permanent cosmetic cover up of the stretch marks or scar tissue.

Others use this as an opportunity to get the tattoo of their dreams. Having to get a larger tattoo then becomes an opportunity instead of an obstacle because it allows someone to get the kind of large and complex tattoo that will instantly get someone’s attention in a positive way.

Regardless of the tattoo option you choose, there are a few factors you should be aware of before you go to the tattoo artist.

A Few Things to Know

flesh colored tattoo

Image from Allure

First of all, you’ll need to make sure the stretch marks or scar tissue are healed before going to the tattoo artist. This helps protect your body while also making the tattoo work easier.

That’s because healed stretch marks tend to be more faded and easier to “hide” inside of a tattoo. Meanwhile, newer stretch marks tend to be purple or red: it’s harder to hide those colors, and you may not want the kind of vibrant tattoo it would take to incorporate bright red and purple into it.

In addition to color, you should note whether the stretch marks are raised up from the skin or not. When these marks are flat, it’s easier to disguise them with a tattoo. Raised stretch marks are harder to work with, though they may flatten out as they heal.

The Occasional Touch-up

floral stretch mark tattoo

Image from Inked Mag

Ever had a tattoo touch-up? It’s a simple idea: instead of giving you a new tattoo, the artist can add color and depth to old tattoos that appear faded or damaged.

We’re bringing that up because tattoos over scars or stretch marks may become damaged over time, especially if more stretch marks should appear in the same area of the original tattoo.

There’s nothing wrong with getting tattoos touched up (we recommend doing it to keep ink looking fresh), but you should know this is a possibility.

Tattooing Over Stretch Marks: Final Thoughts

Now you’ve learned all about tattooing over stretch marks. But do you know where to learn more secrets about the tattoo industry?

At Tattooing 101, we bring you the latest news from the empire of ink. Be sure to bookmark this site so you can stay in the loop!