Learning how to tune a handmade machine. Experiencing overheating at 6volts and choppy lines


Fast track your progress with the world's premier training program the Artist Accelerator


Seigard

Basic
Joined
25 Aug 2021
Messages
16
Location
Turkey
First Name
Seigard
Gender
Male
I'm having a little hard time understanding how to tune my coil liner machine. Mainly because I'm an amateur but also because the information I read is hard to apply to my machine since it's handmade. I always see people mentioning machines by product names and which power supply settings work for it but it seems very off from how I've been running my coil machine.

For example I've read that most people use 7-9 volts for lining with a coil machine and if I try that with my machine it would burn the back of my hand. Currently I run at 5.5 volts and I'm not entirely sure if it's too slow, however if I go past 6 it will start heating up considerably at the coils. Also might be important to mention I got 2 rubbers on it so maybe friction might heat it up too.

Also my power supply doesn't show RPM or duty, it just shows the voltage so I'm kind of relying on some other things I've learned from videos. For example I'll press the pedal and start dialing up the power from 0, once I hear the ''bzzt'' type of breaking point, I will move 1 or 0.5 volts further and put my finger on the armature bar to see if it can still keep going. Usually at the spot it will sound right, not too low but also not too disturbing. However in the videos I see that at low voltages people's coil machines will actually stop when they put their fingers on the bar and they'll kick start it with a touch at the back of the bar but even at 1v my machine won't stop working, it just makes a low buzz and continues as soon as I pull away my finger, leading me to think something's off with the tuning.

Lastly I've been leaving somewhat an approximate gap between the contact screw and the front spring. I've read that it should be about the size of a dime for a liner but I don't have dimes where I live so I'm just going with what I assume to be a ''coin sized gap''. It is slightly larger of a gap than what the guy that made the machine set up when he handed it to me, so perhaps this is the point where I'm messing up? Also if overheating is an issue with the machine itself regardless of how I tune it, I can always take it to the machine shop and get it checked out, but I don't want to go there if this is a blatant issue on my end.

I would very much appreciate your tips on tuning a machine and also would appreciate any ideas you might have as to what might be causing the overheating. Is the machine supposed to heat up if the gap is too large? Or is that a defect that I should get checked? Is the 7-9 volts thing default or is 5.5v that I've been running at also fine? Could these issues explain why I have choppy lines despite pulling steady lines and using plenty of shaken ink? Thank you very much in advance for any input you may have.
 

NewlineTa2

Premium
Joined
25 Jan 2018
Messages
53
Media
8
Location
Georgia
First Name
Joseph
Gender
Male
Chances are that the coils are wrapped with subpar wire causing too much resistance therefore heat
 

Seigard

Basic
Joined
25 Aug 2021
Messages
16
Location
Turkey
First Name
Seigard
Gender
Male
what handmade machine is it, can you show a picture of both sides of the machine?
was it built by a reputable builder, if so could you send it back to him for setting and tuning?
He's the most reputable builder where I live and if there's an issue with the device I'm confident he'd fix it once I bring it to him. I could also visit him for setting and tuning if that would help. I've attached both sides of the machine and also the gap between the bar and the screw.
wQw4lcY.jpg
KvnNnkN.jpg
4RUndIu.jpg
 

dirtnail

Premium Gold
Joined
19 May 2017
Messages
747
Media
14
Location
Netherlands
First Name
Pieter
Gender
Male
There are a lot of variables that can affect how your machine runs so I would suggest not messing with it too much if you don't know what you are doing. Possibly slightly tweak the contact screw but that's it.

When possible ask the builder to set it up for you, if it's a cool person they might give you some tips even. Also ask for the recommended volt range and needle groupings. So then atleast you know it's running like it's supposed to... all other issues will then be down to your technique šŸ˜‰

If you want to learn tuning I would say read up on the mechanics and get a second machine to play with.

One thing I noticed but don't know if other people also experienced this... To me it seems that coils are harder to work with on fake skin. Don't know why but I struggled with coils while rotaries work fine. Maybe it's something with the time the needle stays in the skin or something... or maybe it's my imagination...
 

Cyberthrasher

Premium
Joined
23 Sep 2019
Messages
1,068
Location
US
First Name
Allen
Gender
Male
allens_tattoo_art
maybe it's just me, but those springs look pretty heavy too. That mixed with such a big gap is going to cause the coils to charge longer before they're able to pull the armature bar down. I'd still ask the builder to help you, but try tightening up your contact screw. Probably closer to half of what you have the gap set at right now. Just be sure the contact screw isn't bending the rear spring down lower than the rear shelf.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Fast track your progress - The complete online tattooing course for beginners


Top