Buying coil machine to line with shader needles, I need some help!


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funkyvibes

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Hi, I am new to the forum and even if I tried to use the search bar I haven't been able to find the answers i was looking for.
I have been tattooing for about 1 year with a s*itty pen machine that my friend gifted me, and I have become quite good with it.
My main problem is that I love really bold lines (14-18 rs) and my machine can't really punch them needles in, so I wanted to buy myself a good coil machine.

The doubt that I have is: if I want to use a coil to line with a shader needle should I get a shader or liner setup machine. As far as I know the difference is that a shader machine is a bit more ''powerful'' as it has to punch in larger needle configurations, but searching on Google I couldn't really find an answer.

Also, I just want one coil to line with, as my pen machine runs pretty smooth at shading.
So, if anyone can help me out it would be great and advices from which manufacturer to buy (prefer handmade) are much appreciated (surfing on this forum I found out that Kylin machines have a pretty good price-quality compromise, would love to hear more from someone who knows more than me).

Have a great day you all!
 

Torb

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Hi.
Definitely buy a liner. I have heard that the Sunskin coil liners are really powerful and I see you are from Italy where they are made. I have a Dringenberg p3 liner which I love. I find the slower running punchy liners are best for fat lines. đź‘Ť
 

Cyberthrasher

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allens_tattoo_art
buy a liner. You're a little misinformed on the machine specs though.
A liner will always be your heaviest hitting fastest machine. It needs to punch the lines in with one shot, fully saturated, and move on. Even more so if you're running large groupings.

A "shader" is a little less specific. If you're looking for black and grey shading you'd normally want it to be pretty soft and on the slower end so you can build up gentle layers. If you want plain old black shading (traditional style) you can get away with something that hits harder and a little faster. I'll normally just use my color packer for this.

Color packers are often setup faster than a shader, but slower than a liner, and hit nice and hard like a liner. This allows you to pack in the color nice and saturated, and again, move along without overworking the skin. If you have a slow hand though, a slow/soft shader would be a better match.
 

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